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The Dunnerdale Fells

I had the chance of a swift walk with the dogs at the end of the afternoon so I had a wander around some of the Dunnerdale fells. It turned out to be a stunning sunset, something that didn’t look like it would happen until the very end so I am glad we braved the cold wind and went for it!

The Dunnerdale Fells

There was further sunshine and haze today. We had a short walk around a couple of old favourites up above Broughton Mills – Stickle Pike and Tarn Hill. It felt really warm in the sunshine today, in fact I was in shirt sleeves which I guess is unusual for February – not that I am complaining!

Dunnerdale Fells

Today’s walk is a Wainwright/Birkett hybrid, taking in Stickle Pike – a personal favourite, the undulating Tarn Hill, a vague top named ‘Dunnerdale Fells’ (a separate ‘Outlying Fell’ walk chapter by Wainwright) and Great Stickle. The views to the north were superb, especially towards the end when the clouds lifted from the high fells.

Caw and the Dunnerdale Fells

A short walk this morning over another almost undiscovered jewel – Caw and the Dunnerdale Fells. It is not often you can walk completely alone for miles, especially during half term, but this was the case today.

The Dunnerdale Fells

A short walk this morning to the Dunnerdale Fells from Stonestar on the Duddon Bridge – Ulpha road. This walk follows Wainwright’s Dunnerdale Fells chapter in his book ‘The Outlying Fells of Lakeland’, page 132.

The Dunnerdale Fells

We had a walk around the Dunnerdale Fells starting from Stonestar on the Duddon Valley road this warm afternoon. This is a lovely and quiet area – hard to find on a Good Friday afternoon I think! It also took in Stickle Pike and Stickle Tarn, the area we walked on Wednesday from the Lickle Valley side.

The walk was a hybrid of two Wainwright Outlying Fell walks. Stickle Pike is described in Wainwright’s Stickle Pike chapter in his book ‘The Outlying Fells of Lakeland’, page 126 and The Dunnerdale Fells are described in the Dunnerdale Fells chapter on page 132.

Dunnerdale Fells

It was very hazy again today with the sun trying to burn through and making it quite warm. We stayed low on the quiet but lovely Dunnerdale fells followed by a cooling dip (for some of us anyway!) in the River Duddon.

Dunnerdale Fells

Back to nearer home today with a walk up to the group of small, rough fells known as The Dunnerdale Fells lying between the Duddon Valley and Lickle Valley . The clear weather of yesterday has disappeared again and the rain was threatening but thankfully it stayed off. The bracken is noticeably turning brown now – we should know, we waded through enough of it today!

Dunnerdale Fells

It was a superb sunny morning this morning for our walk around the Dunnerdale Fells. It was one of those days when it is truly a joy to be out – the sun was shining, the birds were singing and there wasn’t a soul about. Casper and Angus certainly enjoyed the run out, as did I!

Dunnerdale Fells

I had a shorter walk today in poorer conditions than yesterday up to the Dunnerdale Fells. Angus (the old trooper) was out as well, loving every minute of it of course! It seems like a while since I’ve been up here, certainly before the summer, yet it looks quite wintry already…

Dunnerdale Fells

There isn’t much real winter weather around but I suppose that does have its own merits…

The Dunnerdale Fells

It was sunny at home this morning but further inland over the Lakeland fells there was lots of low lying cloud.